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Mixing Together Jigsaw Puzzles



Putting all the pieces of two or more jigsaws together into one pile, mixing up this pile and then trying to successfully assemble all the puzzles in this pile is a way of making a jigsaw different to play and more challenging. If you have jigsaws that you find easy to do then by mixing them together and then trying to assemble them you are creating a challenge that is more difficult to complete or maybe even a lot more difficult than the puzzles would be to do individually without mixing them together. This challenge of mixing two or more jigsaws together means you can do a jigsaw that you have done and completed before and that it won't be when you do it again as part of this challenge the exact same experience as it was before and also the fact that you have done it before should help you when it is part of this challenge.


This challenge can be done with jigsaws that are 2D and/or 3D in form but I think, ideally, works best using only those that are 2D in form and also that they are all of the same material and have similiar in size and shape parts as each other. The greater the difference there is between the jigsaws that are being mixed together in terms of their size, shape, material, weight, colour (both front and back), the number of parts they contain and the image that is on them then the easier it will be to separate them in the pile they have been mixed together in. Therefore if you want this challenge of mixing multiple different jigsaw puzzles together to be as difficult as possible then the more pieces you want these puzzles that you have mixed together to contain and the more similar in appearance you want the pieces of all these puzzles being mixed together to be both in terms of the image on them and colour (both front and back) of them and also the size and shape of their pieces. I would also say that to ensure this challenge is as difficult as possible then it is important that the pieces of all these jigsaws are of the same material and have the same or very similar thicknesses and weight because if this is not the case then it can be very easy to separate the different jigsaws by feeling and touching the pieces of them.


If all the jigsaw puzzles that you have mixed together into a pile contain small parts then this is going to make the challenge of assembling these puzzles from this pile more difficult than if all the parts were large. The reason for this is the shape of these small parts and the images on them will be more difficult to recognize, spot and identify especially when they are all in a pile or grouped next to each other in comparison to if all the jigsaw parts were large in size. The more pieces each of the jigsaw puzzles, that have been mixed together into a pile, have then the more challenging it will likely be to complete the challenge of assembling these puzzles from this pile. This is because it will mean there are then more pieces in this pile which will result in it likely taking longer to sort and arrange these pieces from this pile into separate piles of the puzzles they belong to or that it will just likely take longer to locate any piece you are searching for in this pile of mixed together jigsaws due to the number of pieces in it. Also, when each puzzle, from this challenge of mixing together different jigsaw puzzles into a pile, has a lot of pieces to them then each of these individual puzzles themselves is likely going to take longer and be more difficult to assemble than if they had fewer pieces regardless of whether or not these individual puzzles had been mixed together. This is due to the fact that when it comes to jigsaw puzzles with more or a lot of parts to them it usually takes longer to locate the part(s) you are looking for whilst assembling them as there will be a lot of parts to scan and search through and if these parts are also small then it will likely take even longer to recognize and spot the part(s) you are after or require. The completed image/picture of a jigsaw puzzle will become more divided up the more parts it has which means each part will get less of the overall image/picture of the puzzle on it the more pieces there are to it. Therefore when a piece of a jigsaw puzzle only has a very small part of the overall image/picture on it this can make it difficult to recognise and deduce for this piece which part exactly or even section of the overall image/picture it belongs to. Also, the more pieces a jigsaw has can often mean the smaller in size the pieces of it will be so if the jigsaw puzzles that you have mixed together for this challenge all have plenty of pieces to them it will likely mean all these puzzles are going to have pieces that are small in size and only have a small part of the overall image/picture of the puzzle they belong to on them. It is going to be difficult therefore to then work out which puzzle a piece comes from when it has these attributes of being small in size and only having a small part of the overall image/picture of the puzzle it belongs to on it and when this piece is in a big pile of pieces compiled from the jigsaws you have mixed together in which all the pieces of this big pile also have these attributes. It will be even more difficult to deduce which puzzle a piece belongs to in this scenario of this piece being in a heap of mixed together jigsaw puzzles in which all the pieces of this heap are small in size and only have a small part of the overall image/picture of the puzzle they belong to on them when all the images/pictures and colours of these mixed together jigsaws are very similiar both on the front side and back of them and when there are more jigsaws in this heap. Mixing together 2D jigsaws that all don't have borders into a single heap of all their separated parts can also be very challenging when having to separate and then organise these parts from this heap back into the puzzles they belong to. This is because as there are no border parts in this heap then this could make every part in this heap look the same or similar especially if these parts are similiar to each other in every other way or other ways such as size, shape, the material they are made of and in terms of the image(s) and colour(s) on the front and back of them. When 2D jigsaws have borders to them then the border/edge parts they contain do not always have a straight side(s) with no hole or tab to them as not all 2D jigsaws are square or a rectangle in shape when fully assembled. The shape of 2D jigsaws with borders when they are fully assembled can vary a lot and this shape can be irregular which all means they can have border/edge parts to them that have a side(s) that has no hole or tab which curves or bends. Mixing together 2D jigsaws, that all have borders but are different shapes from each other when fully assembled, into a single heap of all their separated parts can make it easier to tell which border parts in this heap belong to which puzzle because the border parts that belong to one or some of these puzzles may have to them a straight side(s) with no hole or tab and the other puzzle(s) has border parts to it/them that have a curved side(s) with no hole or tab. Using only 2D jigsaw puzzles that have the same or similarly shaped borders as each other will help to ensure that it is not easy to identify which border parts belong to which of these puzzles when these puzzles have been mixed together into a single heap of all their separated parts.


If each of the jigsaw puzzles that are being mixed together into one heap for this challenge is solid coloured which means that each puzzle has just one shade of colour to it as the image/picture of it then this can be very challenging to solve when all the puzzles that have been mixed together in this heap also have on the front as well the back of them the same or very similar colours/shade of colours as each other and when the shape and size of their pieces are similiar to. It is important to make sure that the jigsaws that you are going to mix together when they all are single-sided meaning they have no image/picture on the back/reverse side of them are all the same colour or of a very similar colour/shade of colour on the back/reverse side of them. This is because it will be otherwise a lot easier to separate the pieces of these mixed together single-sided jigsaw puzzles into the puzzles they belong to when the colour/shade of colour on the back/reverse sides of these puzzles are different from each other even if the front sides of these puzzles are very similiar to each other in terms of the image and colour(s) on them. Mixing together single-sided jigsaw puzzles which all have a similiar image/picture on them when these puzzles use similar colours and/or shades of colours for that image/picture can make this challenge difficult and quite confusing to solve as long as the reverse sides of these puzzles are similar or the same colour/shade of colour as each other. There are plenty of 2D single-sided jigsaw puzzles that have a sky, for example, as the main image/picture of them so finding for this challenge two or more of them that have a sky as the main image/picture of them in which these puzzles have similar in colour and/or shade of colour skies as each other and additionally the back/reverse sides of them are similiar in colour to each other should be relatively easy to do. A field, a beach, the sea, outer space and a crowd of people are also examples of images that are found on a lot of single-sided 2d jigsaws as the main image/picture of them which you could each use for this challenge in the same way as the sky example just mentioned and would potentially work just as well. It is also important to make sure that whatever the main image/picture is that will be the same for each of the 2D single-sided jigsaw puzzles you are mixing together for this challenge that this main image/picture is of a similar size for all of these puzzles as otherwise, this could make it a lot easier to work out which piece belongs to which puzzle when these puzzles have been mixed together in a heap. Mixing together different jigsaw puzzles for this challenge that all use the same colours as each other for the image/picture that is on them with each puzzle having many different colours to them and that these different colours on them only each take up a small amount of area/space on these puzzles would make it potentially very difficult to know which piece belongs to which puzzle when these puzzles have been mixed together in a heap. When a jigsaw, that has been mixed together with another one into a heap of all their individual separated parts, has a colour on it that is similar to a colour that is on another puzzle it has been mixed together with then this can make it tricky to work out which puzzle a piece belongs to in this heap that has a colour which is like this on it. The colours that I am referring to here that are similiar to each other that can be difficult to tell apart are for example the colours blue and purple, the colours orange and red, the colours grey and silver or the colours gold and yellow. Colours that are similiar to each other can be even more difficult to tell apart and have less contrast between them when they are also similiar in terms of their shade whether this shade is dark or light. Colours can also be mixed and certain mixed colours can be difficult to distinguish from the colours that have been used to make this mixed colour, for example, the mixed colour reddish-brown can be really difficult to tell apart from either of the colours that have been used to make it which are in this example red and brown. A gradient jigsaw is a type of jigsaw that has as the main image/picture of it just colour which could be either one colour or multiple colours and when it has just the one colour then the main image/picture will show a change or transition in shade for this particular colour which could be either from light to dark, light to lighter or even dark to darker. When there are multiples colours to the main image/picture of a gradient jigsaw then this main image/picture could show a change or transition in shade for each of these multiple colours but will definitely show each of these multiple colours transitioning or changing into another colour that is next to them. Therefore mixing two or more similiar looking gradient jigsaw puzzles together into one heap of all their separated individual parts when all these puzzles have the same or similiar colour or colours on them could be a potential nightmarish and confusing challenge to then separate these parts of this heap into the puzzles they belong due to these puzzles not only having the same or similiar colour pieces as each other but also that these pieces are of different shades and/or mixtures of colours. Any difference there is between these similiar looking gradient jigsaw puzzles in terms of the physical shape and size of their pieces or the colour on the backs of their pieces will be therefore helpful and be important to look out for when separating their parts that are in this pile, which contains all the separated parts from all these similar-looking to each other gradient jigsaw puzzles being used for this challenge, into the puzzles they belong to. After the parts of these similiar looking to each other gradient jigsaw puzzles have been separated from each other into the puzzles they belong to then putting these puzzles together from this point can still be a big challenge in itself and not plain sailing as gradient jigsaw puzzles are some of the most difficult jigsaw challenges to do just in a normal way without mixing them together.


Mixing together the jigsaw puzzles you are using for this challenge thoroughly means the pile, that you have created from all the parts of all of the puzzles you are using for this challenge, is mixed up entirely from top to bottom for at least a minute to ensure the parts belonging to a particular puzzle in this pile don't all stay together which should ensure this challenge is not easy to solve. The more parts there are in this pile then the more time you should take and add to this minute to mix this pile up thoroughly as more time will likely be needed to ensure this pile is mixed up thoroughly. If the jigsaw puzzles that you are mixing together have pieces that are very similar to each other both in terms of their physical appearance and the image and colour that is on the front and back of them then it might be difficult to judge just from sight how mixed up these puzzles would be when mixed together which is why it is better to judge and gauge this by how much time you have spent mixing these them up. The most effective way of ensuring that jigsaw puzzles are well mixed together and that this is done as quickly as possible is to use both of your hands to grab the pieces from the pile that these puzzles are being mixed together in so that these pieces can then be mixed up in this by placing them somewhere else in the pile. When grabbing pieces from this pile of mixed together jigsaw puzzles and then placing them somewhere else in this pile you should also grab as many pieces as you can with both hands as this will also help to ensure the puzzles of this pile are well mixed up together and that this is done quickly. Whilst grabbing the pieces from the heap of mixed together jigsaws and placing them somewhere else in this heap you should try not to squeeze the pieces as this could deform or break them but instead use your hands more as scoops to pick them up from the pile, to then hold them and then to drop them somewhere else in the pile. If all the jigsaws that you are mixing together only contain when combined altogether a few pieces such as below a hundred pieces then I would not recommend grabbing as many pieces as you can from the pile, that these jigsaws have been combined together in, with both of your hands to then put them somewhere else in this pile instead just grab half a dozen pieces in each hand as this approach will better ensure that these jigsaws in this pile are thoroughly mixed together. When all the parts of all the jigsaws you are using for this challenge have been put in a heap together to be mixed up and this pile contains 30 or fewer parts then I would recommend only grabbing 1 or 2 pieces at a time from this heap in each of your hands to then place these pieces somewhere else in this heap as this I believe will be the best way to mix up a heap with this amount of pieces in a thorough and quick manner. To mix up well this pile that contains all the pieces from all the jigsaws being used for this challenge then I would advise every now and then whilst mixing this pile to take pieces from the very bottom of the pile and place them on the top and to also from time to time take pieces that are on the outside of the pile and place them in the centre of it. A simple approach that could help in ensuring that all the jigsaws for this challenge are well mixed up together in a pile is when taking or pouring the pieces for the first of these jigsaws out of their box/container is to then only take or pour out a third or even a quarter of all these pieces from their box/container into a pile. Then add to this heap by repeating this approach for the rest of the jigsaw puzzles being used for this challenge so that now every puzzle you are using for this challenge has a third or a quarter of their total pieces in this heap. Next, you further add to this heap by adding for each puzzle being using used in this challenge another third or quarter of their total pieces from the container/box they come in and do this in the same order that you used when you took or poured out for each of these puzzles the first third or quarter of their total pieces. Repeat this until all the pieces from all the puzzles you are using for this challenge have been removed from the containers/boxes they come in and have been put in the same heap together and then at this point, all the puzzles you are using for this challenge will already be somewhat mixed up before you go on to properly and further mix them up with your hands.


If you really want to make this challenge of mixing together jigsaws extremely difficult and a nightmare to solve then only using double-sided ones or only using clear ones would be both great ways to go about achieving this. Double-sided ones can make this challenge really difficult to solve because you will then have to frequently check the front and back of the pieces of them when you are determining which puzzle a piece, from the pile of mixed together double-sided jigsaws, belongs to. When you know which puzzle a piece, from this pile of mixed together double-sided jigsaws, belongs to then you will also have to check the front and back of this piece again when you are assembling the puzzle the piece belongs to in order to ensure the piece is the right way up for the side/image of the double-sided jigsaw you are doing. If the double-sided jigsaws that you have chosen for this challenge are all similiar to each other in terms of the size, shape, material and thickness of their pieces and in terms of the colour(s) and image(s) on both sides of them then this challenge can really be daunting to solve. Additionally, if the picture/image is on one side of these similar to each other double-sided jigsaws, that you have mixed together, also very similiar to the reverse side or even the exact same but with the picture/image on one side rotated to a different angle to the picture/image on the reverse side then this would further increase the difficulty of this challenge to a more extreme and confusing level.


Using only clear jigsaws would be another way of making this challenge of mixing together jigsaws a nightmare to solve and will be most difficult when they are all of the same material and their parts are very similar to each other in terms of shape, colour, size and thickness. Clear jigsaws can be either 2D or 3D in form but no matter the form has most, if not all, the pieces of it see-through and these transparent pieces will be made of either the material plastic or glass. The transparent pieces of this type of jigsaw are often all colourless but when they are coloured then they are normally all one colour although they can sometimes be of different colours or shades of colour or even an individual piece be of different colours or shades of a colour. This challenge of mixing together clear jigsaws I believe works best when they are 2D in form as it is much easier to find a 2D clear jigsaw that will have parts that are similiar to another 2D clear jigsaw in terms of the shape, size, material and thickness of these parts than it is for 3D clear jigsaws. Using clear jigsaws when they have a lot of pieces and when the pieces of all the clear jigsaws used for this challenge are colourless and physically similar to each other is about as difficult as this challenge of mixing together jigsaws can get as there's no image or colour on the pieces to help you decide which puzzle they belong to and/or how to assemble them. You would in this very specific scenario only have the shape, thickness and size of these colourless transparent pieces to help you figure out which clear jigsaw they are a part of when all the clear jigsaws these pieces belong to have been mixed together into a pile and even these physical characteristics of the pieces won't be too much help as all the clear jigsaws being used in this scenario would have pieces that are physically very similar to each other. After you have successfully figured out for every colourless see-through piece which puzzle it belongs to in this scenario then assembling these clear jigsaws will also likely be very challenging. The reason for this is you'll only have the shape (tabs and holes) and the size of the pieces to help you with this and if these pieces, for the clear jigsaw you are assembling, are very similar to each other in these aspects then again it will be really difficult to work out which piece goes where when trying to put them together.


Mixing together two or more jigsaw puzzles that are exactly the same as each other in every way or in other words exact replicas of each other is a lot easier to solve than when the puzzles being mixed are different from each other. This is because when two or more jigsaw puzzles, that are exactly the same as each other, have been mixed together in a pile then there will be two or more of the same piece for every piece in this pile at the beginning which will mean you have two or three chances to find the piece you are looking for in this pile and this can make a piece easy to locate. However, when the jigsaw puzzles that have been mixed together into a pile are different from each other then there is only going to be one of each piece from each of the mixed together puzzles in this pile which will mean when you are looking for a piece in this pile there will only be one of that piece that can be found and this can make finding that piece very difficult. Another issue with mixing together two or more jigsaws that are exactly the same as each other would be that it could be boring assembling the same puzzle more than once especially if you chose to assemble them consecutively instead of at the same time. Also once you have fully completed or done a part of one of these mixed together jigsaw puzzles that are exact replicas of each other then you will automatically know how to complete or do that part that you have done for the other puzzle(s) that are a part of this challenge which would not be the case if the puzzles of this challenge were different to each other. Finally, you would need to have access to two or more jigsaws that are exactly the same as each other to do this challenge of mixing together two or more jigsaws that are exact replicas of each other which I imagine for most people won't be the case.


Ensuring you have enough space to do this challenge before you start is going to be very important as you need enough space to fit the pile that will contain all the parts of all the jigsaws you are using for this challenge and then also room to fit all the puzzles you are going to assemble from this pile. Therefore how much space you can find or have at your disposal for this challenge will determine how many jigsaws you can mix together for this challenge and how large they in size when fully assembled can be for this challenge. The best place to do this challenge of mixing together jigsaws would be on a table or desk that has a flat surface that doesn't slant and that this table can be totally cleared or at least enough space can be cleared on it to be able to do this challenge for the specific puzzles you have chosen to do for this challenge. Ideally, the table you are doing this challenge on will be in a well-lit place and if this is not the case or not possible then it would be advisable to find a lamp you can use to ensure the table you are doing this challenge on is well lit as being able to see the jigsaw parts clearly is obviously important and sometimes even vital to completing this challenge. This challenge is only practical outdoors when it is not raining, cold or windy and when the light is good but really this should be done indoors as outdoor/weather conditions can change quickly and as there is a much greater risk of losing a part(s) permanently when it is lost outdoors than when lost indoors. I would avoid doing this challenge directly on the floor even if it is done in a cleared space that is indoors and out of the way of anybody potentially walking or treading on the puzzles being used or their pieces as I have found from personal experience it is much easier to misplace pieces outside the area you have designated to do this challenge in and then lose these pieces when doing a jigsaw directly on the floor than when on a table or a tray/mat. The smaller the parts are that you are using for this challenge then the greater the risk is that a part(s) goes missing and this risk increases further the more parts there are to this challenge. If the parts that you are using in this challenge are clear or the colour either on the front or back of them matches the colour of the surface you are placing them on to do this challenge and/or matches the colour of the surface right next to the surface you are placing them on to do this challenge then these parts can also be easily lost track of and therefore go missing as those parts would then blend in with those surfaces. Therefore to try to ensure none of the parts for any of the jigsaws used for this challenge become lost it is best to make sure these parts for the entire duration of this challenge never leave or are placed outside the space you have designated for doing this challenge. The entire duration of the challenge starts at the point you remove the parts from the boxes/containers they came in until the point you put them back in the boxes/containers they came in after the challenge has been completed and the jigsaws involved dismantled. Another way of minimalising the chances of losing a part whilst doing this challenge would be to only mix together two or at the most three jigsaws with none of these puzzles exceeding 500 pieces. This way won't guarantee a part isn't lost but should allow for you to make the challenge a challenging one to solve whilst not being too difficult for you to keep track of all the parts involved and should also mean this challenge won't take up too big a space to play it on.


Once you have found a place that is suitable for doing this challenge of mixing together multiple jigsaw puzzles and have chosen the puzzles you would like to do for this challenge then it is time to begin. The first step to this challenge is to remove carefully all the parts of each puzzle you are using for this challenge out of the boxes, containers or packaging they came in either by hand or by pouring them so that they are now on the surface you have chosen to do this challenge without losing any of these parts. To do this first step successfully it is best to ensure that the box, container or packaging that the jigsaw parts are being removed from is being held directly above the surface you are intending to place these parts on whilst you are removing all these parts from it and whilst putting these parts from it either by hand or by pouring them out of it onto this surface. When all the pieces from each of the jigsaws you are using for this challenge are now on the surface area you are doing this challenge on it is then time to push all of these pieces into one combined pile and to do this without any of these pieces leaving the surface area you have designated for this challenge. Once you have pushed or placed all the pieces from each of the puzzles you are using for this challenge into one pile then you have to mix this pile up thoroughly and whilst doing this ensure none of the pieces become detached from the pile. When this pile has been mixed up thoroughly you can then begin to start solving this challenge and to solve this challenge you will have to fully assemble all the jigsaws that are in this pile you have just created.


At this point, there are two approaches to solving this challenge with the first approach being to separate the pieces of this pile of mixed together jigsaw puzzles into smaller piles of the puzzles they belong to whilst ensuring the whole time doing this that all these pieces don't leave the surface area you have designated to do this challenge and then once this has been completed you can assemble fully the puzzles from these smaller piles. Alternatively, the second approach would be just to start fully assembling the puzzles from the pile of mixed together jigsaw puzzles without first sorting this pile into smaller piles of the puzzles the pieces belong to. The first approach makes this challenge far easier to complete than the second because once you have separated the pieces of the pile of mixed together jigsaw puzzles into piles of the puzzles they belong to, which is the difficult part of this first approach, then from this point on you have simplified and uncomplicated this challenge as the puzzles are no longer mixed together. Whereas with the second approach to this challenge the jigsaw puzzles will still be mixed together in a pile until the challenge is basically finished and all puzzles of it have been fully assembled. This means that the element of the challenge that makes it difficult to solve, which is separating the mixed together jigsaws, is there until basically the very end of this challenge when the second approach is taken which is not the case with the first approach. The first approach to this challenge means once you have separated the pieces of the mixed together jigsaw puzzles into piles of the puzzles they belong to you can work on these puzzles individually and do them completely separate from each other. Whilst the second approach to this challenge means you will be working on and assembling all the jigsaws, that have all been mixed together into a pile, at the same time until they are all basically completed which is why the second approach might be the more fun approach as it is more challenging and more in the spirit of the challenge. No matter which of these two approaches is used for this challenge it will be the ability of the person doing it to identify which piece in the pile of mixed together jigsaw puzzles belongs to which puzzle that is key to solving the challenge and if all the pieces in this pile are similar looking then this ability is going to be really tested.


Separating the pieces of the pile of jigsaw puzzles that you have mixed together into separate piles of the puzzles they belong to, which is the first approach to this challenge, should get easier every time you figure out which puzzle a piece from this pile belongs to as this piece will then be removed the pile of mixed together jigsaw puzzles, thus reducing this pile, and put into the pile designated for the puzzle it belongs to. The more this pile of mixed together jigsaws reduces the easier it should be to spot and locate any specific piece in this pile you are looking for as there will obviously be fewer pieces you have to search through. As this pile is reduced there should come a point if this is not already the case when you will then have the space to spread all the pieces of this pile out so that you can see clearly each piece individually which should help in separating them into the puzzles they belong to. These piles, which each represent a different jigsaw, of pieces that you have now created can as they get bigger become more useful in terms of helping to determine which jigsaw a piece from the pile of mixed together jigsaws belongs to. This is because as these piles, which each represent a different puzzle, of pieces grow there is more chance that one of the pieces in these piles will either connect to or have an image on it that will correspond with the piece from the pile of mixed together jigsaws that you are trying to determine which puzzle it belongs to. Once the pieces of the pile of mixed together jigsaw puzzles have been separated into piles of the puzzles they belong to you will now be able to just assemble each of these puzzles from these piles individually and separately as you would a normal jigsaw challenge as they are no longer mixed together. You will though at this point have the option to either assemble these puzzles one after the other or to assemble them simultaneously but from my experience assembling the jigsaw puzzles one after the other is the easier option as it allows you to fully concentrate on each puzzle which should mean you assemble them quicker and with less difficulty.


The second approach to this challenge of assembling mixed together jigsaw puzzles will mean you are assembling all the puzzles in this challenge simultaneously from the pile they have been mixed together in and not, as with the first approach, separating the pieces of this pile into piles of the puzzles they belong to and then putting the puzzles together. This second approach does have one similarity with the first approach in that every time you identify which puzzle a piece belongs to then this piece will be removed from the pile of mixed together jigsaws it had been in thus reducing this pile. However, this second approach will then differ from the first approach as this piece being removed from the pile of mixed together jigsaws will then be attached to or placed with the pieces belonging to the same puzzle to form that puzzle rather than this piece just being placed in a pile with other pieces belonging to the same puzzle. As the pile consisting of jigsaws mixed together becomes reduced it should get easier and easier to identify and spot a specific part you are looking for in this pile and then when this pile is reduced enough there should be at some point enough space, on the place you are doing this challenge, for the pieces of this pile to be spread out so each piece can be clearly seen individually if there was not enough space to already do this when the pile hadn't been reduced. For this second approach, I think it would be best that the first pieces you select to remove from the pile of mixed together jigsaws and then assemble when dealing with jigsaws that are 2D would be the border pieces if they have them. This is because these border pieces are the easiest to recognise as they will have an edge(s) to them with no hole or tab and when all these border pieces are found and assembled they will give the jigsaws they belong to that you are assembling a framework to build from. After removing and assembling all the border pieces from the pile of mixed together jigsaws then the next pieces I would recommend removing and assembling would be either those that connect directly to the border pieces that have already been assembled, those pieces that have on them a part of any individual/standout image of the jigsaw they belong to or any piece that is very unique either in terms of the shape of it or the colour/image on it. If a jigsaw, that you are assembling from the pile of mixed together jigsaws, doesn't have an individual/standout image to it or any really unique pieces to it then I would in this case assemble it by adding pieces to the border of the jigsaw, that you have already assembled, and keep adding to these assembled pieces until it is complete. However, if the puzzle, that you are assembling from the pile of mixed together jigsaws, does have pieces that have part of an individual/standout image on them or are very unique then I would recommend removing these from the pile of mixed together jigsaws and placing them inside the border, that you have already assembled, of the jigsaw they belong to and assemble them in there. The next step after this would be to find and remove from the pile of mixed together jigsaws any pieces that either connect to the border pieces of this jigsaw or that connect to those pieces that you have assembled together and/or placed inside the border of this jigsaw that are very unique or that have part of an individual/standout image on them. Once these pieces have been found and removed from the pile of mixed together jigsaws then they should be attached to the pieces of the jigsaw they connect to that have already been removed from this pile. Then the last step is to remove those pieces, that are remaining, from the pile of mixed together jigsaws that directly connect to the pieces that have already been removed and then assembled from this pile and when each of those pieces is found and removed from this pile they are then connected to the pieces that have already been removed and assembled from this pile that they directly connect to. This last step is repeated until this jigsaw has been finally fully assembled and completed which will mean all the pieces that belong to it have been removed from and are no longer present in the pile of mixed together jigsaws.

It is a good idea and highly recommendable in the beginning when doing this challenge of mixing together jigsaw puzzles for the very first time to make it an easy task to solve and complete and then increase the difficulty level of this challenge as you get better and more confident at doing it. Therefore with this in mind the first time you do this challenge it should only involve two puzzles and neither of them should have more than 200 pieces to them. I would also only use 2D jigsaws when doing this challenge for the first time as I find this challenge works best when all the jigsaws involved have similiar pieces to each other in terms of their physical attributes and this is a lot more difficult to find with 3D jigsaws than it is with 2D. The 2D jigsaw puzzles when doing this challenge for the very first time should be single-sided with borders that have medium to large-sized pieces in order to prevent the challenge from being too complex and difficult. The 2D jigsaw puzzles used when doing this challenge for the first time should be noticeably different from each other in terms of their pieces in order not to make it too difficult and confusing to know which puzzle the pieces of these 2D jigsaw puzzles belong to when these puzzles have been mixed together. Therefore the more ways that the 2D jigsaws differ from each other in terms of their pieces and the bigger the difference in these ways the better when doing this challenge for the first time as it will then be easier to figure out which of the puzzles a piece belongs to when these 2D jigsaw puzzles have been mixed together. These ways that you want the 2D jigsaws to differ from each other in terms of their pieces in order to make this challenge for the first time easier are the image(s) and colour(s) on the pieces and the size, thickness, material and shape of the pieces. It would be a good idea to choose 2D jigsaw puzzles that you have done and completed before when doing this challenge for the first time as this should make it easier to recognise which piece belongs to which puzzle when the 2D jigsaws have been mixed together and will almost certainly make it easier to assemble these puzzles when you have done them before successfully. Looking at and inspecting the pictures of the puzzles fully assembled that are on the boxes/packaging that the 2D jigsaw puzzles, which you are using for doing this challenge for the first time, came in can be a big help in determining which puzzle a piece belongs to when the 2D jigsaws have been mixed together. The images of the puzzles fully assembled that are on the boxes/packaging that the 2D jigsaw puzzles, which are being used to do this challenge for the first time, came in should also be constantly checked until you have a clear image of these images in your mind as this can make it even easier to then recognise which puzzle a piece belongs to when the 2D jigsaws have been mixed together. Once you have successfully done this challenge for the very first time you can then make this challenge gradually more difficult and challenging every time that you come back to do it after having successfully done it the previous time. To make this challenge of mixing together jigsaw puzzles more difficult you can choose to use puzzles that have more parts to them, that have smaller parts, that have more similar parts to each other, that have parts that are all very similiar and/or to use more challenging types of jigsaws such as those that have a lot of small images on them, those that have a lot of different colours to them, those that are borderless, those that are solid coloured, those that are gradient or those that are double-sided.


In summary, this challenge of mixing together jigsaws is an alternative way of doing a jigsaw that you may find fun and tricky to do especially if you have not tried it before. In my opinion, this challenge works best using just 2D jigsaws but more important than this is that the puzzles used have parts that are similar to each other physically and also in terms of the image(s) and colour(s) on the front and back of them. One of the best reasons to recommend this challenge is that it can be a way to do a jigsaw again that you have already completed and done before but for it to be a new and different experience. An important final tip for this challenge is to not mix together too many puzzles as this can make the challenge a long and tedious experience rather than the fun and engaging time it can be and you will want it to be.

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